Home & Garden Gardening

Vegetable Garden Layout - How to Do it Right From the Start

With vegetable gardening it's critical as an imperative part of your vegetable garden layout, to find the sunniest and brightest spot available in your yard.
Plants love bright sunlight, and need at least five hours of it every day.
They also love and need water, so somewhere straightforward to reach with a hose is also an excellent idea to think about.
Then you want to consider what crops you need to grow, and read up on their individual necessities.
If you check the back of seed packets, you'll see the details there, for what sort of space they each need to reach actual potential and this is something for heavy consideration when arranging your vegetable garden layout.
When you have selected the location of your garden and the crops for planting, you must decide how best they're going to fit in your garden.
As a general guide, for a family of four, the following info may help to build the size and layout you may need to have success.
Asparagus: 30-40 plants - Beans: A row 15-20 feet long - Beetroot: A row 10-15 feet long - Broccoli: 10-15 plants - Brussels Sprouts: 10-15 plants - Cabbage: 10-15 plants - Carrots: A row 20-30 feet long - Corn: A row 20-30 feet long - Lettuce: A row 10-15 feet long - Peas: A row 30-40 feet long - Pumpkins: 1-3 plants - Radishes: A row 4-5 feet long - Rhubarb: 1-3 plants - Spinach: A row 10-20 feet long - Tomatoes: 10-15 plants Naturally the above guide is a particularly general one, and you might need to adjust certain facets of the garden according to your families taste.
As an example if you have just one person in the family that likes to eat Brussels sprouts, only plant around 1/4 of the above quantities.
When you have selected your location and the crops you would like to grow, it's time to think about the vegetable garden layout.
Tall crops like your peas, beans and corn must always be planted on the northerly side of your vegetable garden, so they do not cast shade over the other plants in your garden.
In the center of your garden, plant all the medium sized plants like cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, tomatoes, pumpkins, and so on.
Then at the southern end of your vegetable garden, plant all of your low lying crops like radish, carrots, beetroot, lettuce and onions.
A very important consideration that you must decide on is the directional positioning of your rows of vegetables.
It is usually recommended that rows be positioned north to south, to gain the maximum exposure to the daylight.
Running them east to west could cause shadows and shade to be cast on the rows behind.
As you can see there's not a huge amount of brain science concerned in getting the most out of your crops.
Remember the access the plants have to the suns rays and plant accordingly, to reach the very best vegetable garden layout.

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